Good news for elderly kayak anglers

It’s as simple as that: Thanks to a new generation of fishing kayaks, which are lighter, stabler, and more comfortable than common kayaks are, anglers in their sixties and even anglers in their seventies can spend long hours on the water, and enjoy paddling and fishing without suffering from wetness, instability, back pain, leg numbness and cramps, or premature fatigue, which are all symptoms that are commonly experienced by people who fish out of kayaks, especially if they happen to be middle aged and elderly. They can even motorize their kayaks and by doing so travel long distances, and fish in remote locations, without being constrained by the limited physical power they have when paddling is concerned.

Gary is a retired biologist who worked for decades assisting Indian tribes throughout the country in managing their fish and wildlife resources.
He’s in his seventies now, and he lives in Florida.

Says Gary –

Fishing has been my passion since I was young, and I prefer to fish in saltwater, where I go for redfish, sea trout, snook, and other popular local fish species. I practice catch and release, unless someone close (wife or neighbors) orders a particular fish from me for dinner. I fish alone and with other kayak anglers.
Over the years, I’ve owned various fishing boats, and I stuck to the Wavewalk for several reasons; its unmatched stability, comfort and dryness, and the fact that unlike other kayaks it doesn’t hurt my back even if I spend the entire day fishing in it. I can stand up and unkink anytime I want, or lay down on the saddle and stretch.
It’s also lightweight, and that makes it easy for me to take it from my pickup truck to the beach, and back, even with all my fishing gear loaded inside its hulls.

Paddling my W is easy for me, even in harsh weather as it tracks perfectly without the need for a rudder.
In recent years, I’ve discovered the pleasures of wildlife photography out of my W kayak.
I’m planning to add a motor at some point so I can cover even greater distances. I had first opposed the idea of motorizing my kayak, but the numerous videos posted on Wavewalk’s blog have changed my mind.

All in all, it’s the most comfortable and functional fishing kayak I’ve seen.

Here are some pictures of Gary and his senior fishing buddies Bob and Dick:

 

“I honestly don’t think there is any chance that this old man could have landed that fish in any other kayak but the Wavewalk”

It was too windy to fish in the river so I stayed in the lagoon by where my friend lets me keep my “W” kayak on his floating dock. I had been out in the morning about 7:30 AM and caught a small snook about 14 inches – a beautiful fish and since I got him on a small foam rubber “gurgler” fly it was fun to see a fish take that surface fly less than a foot from the mangroves in about eight inches of water. It took a little while reviving him in the water before releasing him before I could go looking for his big brother.
Fished until about noon got a couple of hook ups but nothing came to the boat.
I went back just about 7 PM and staked out at the corner of a nice grass flat in the lagoon next to the mangrove creek that feeds in from the Indian River.

It was low incoming tide one of the best times for the bigger fish to get in close to the flat in about four to five feet of water, they slip up on the grass flat and raid the little mullet fingerlings and grass shrimp and can dash back into the deeper water for cover.
So I fished different flies and different sides of the flat for about an hour… fifteen minutes after sunset I was making my “last cast” for the night and bang a freight train hits my fly about thirty five feet from the kayak I am standing on my platform on top of the center tunnel and all the line starts to shoot out of my striping basket and (for once it is not tangled up) whiz all the line is out of the basket probably 125 feet or so and I am on the reel and it is buzzing. First time I am down to my backing line it is still going out to open water in the lagoon (not back to the mangroves like sneaky snook usually do). So I let him go I mean he is too big and hot to horse in with an eight weight and 10 lb tippet. Three good runs, a couple of tries for the mangroves and 15 minutes later I have him in the boat.

snook caught in kayak night fly fishing, Florida

26″ snook WOW the first really nice fish I have ever caught out of the “W” and it was a beauty it took me almost 10 minutes to revive him pushing him through the water next to the boat. But finally he swam off before I was eaten to death by Florida mosquito’s it was almost dark but I was as high as a tree frog just paddling back to the dock whistling Dixie.

I have caught a few smallish fish in the lagoon but started to think that all the nice ones are in the river.

Oh yeah all you northern woodsman who are wondering why I released a five pound snook instead of eating him, there is a limit here we call “slot” fish, 28″ to 32″ inches if they are in the slot then they are keepers but he was a little shy of the slot. And after one of the best battles I have had on fly since my Trinity river steelhead days, I figured he deserved a second chance anyway.

snook caught in kayak night fly fishing, Florida

I love my “W” fishing kayak … when that fish was on I was thinking he went 360 degrees around the boat did three really long runs and in general made 15 minutes feel like about three. I honestly don’t think there is any chance that this old man could have landed that fish in any other kayak but the Wavewalk. I mean I fish with a friend who has five kayaks SOT and Sit in type and he is an athlete, but I have seen how little room to move and how cramped it is and if your line snags on anything when you have a big fish on a fly (even just for a moment) it is good by fish.

OK the truth is my one man fishing machine is a blend of “W’ stability and flexibility and my friend Rick Rosenberg’s outriggers system, and I JUST LOVE IT.

Going back out now, back to the snook lagoon “Middleton Cove” named after my friend who lets me store my boat on his floating dock – just lift on the bow handles and slide it in the water and I am gone Fishing !

Thanks for listening,

Ted ,
Florida

FL lagoon great for kayak fishing at night.jpg

70 Year Old Fly Kayak Angler: My Experience With The W Fishing Kayak

A fishing kayak review from an experienced angler who’s tried various fishing styles and fishing boats often tell a lot. Here is Glynn Gantenbein’s account of his experience with the W fishing kayak:

I have been flyfishing around the world for 20 years, much of it in a kayak.
I found only two things were missing: a comfortable seating position and the ability to stand up for sighting fish.
After studying videos at Wavewalk, I ordered an inventory of Wavewalk kayaks without even seeing one.
Upon receipt I tested the Wavewalk… -I am 70 years old, weigh 230, have a bad back, need a knee replacement, and have constant vertigo from a chronic ear condition.
During my initial test I was able to stand up and paddle and really enjoyed the seating position called Riding.
IF I CAN DO IT, ANYONE CAN!!
The Wavewalk 500 is fast and runs straight.
Everything you read is correct.
One of my customers put a $100 trolling motor on his and said he was “going water skiing”… which was his way of saying its fast.

Glynn

big redfish caught in a kayak fishing trip Texas

My first red fish, caught on a fly

DIY motor mount for fishing kayak. Texas

What Use Can Seniors Have Of A Typical SOT Fishing Kayak?

The typical fishing kayak these days is a big, long and heavy SOT kayak, equipped with all the bells and whistles one can imagine. Aside from the fact that sitting in it hurts your back, and is uncomfortable for your legs, it’s also very heavy, and hard to paddle.

The typical fishing kayak these days is a big, long and heavy SOT kayak, equipped with all the bells and whistles one can imagine. Aside from the fact that sitting in it hurts your back, and is uncomfortable for your legs, it’s also very heavy, and hard to paddle.
On top of that, those kayaks are advertised as being stable enough for stand up fishing, but it turns out that it’s not exactly a realistic description…

A  fishing kayak review combined with a fishing trip report recently published on the  the Jacksonville Kayak Fishing forum tells the story from the angle of a fly angler who’s not old, but has had back pain, and a herniated lumbar disk:

I bought a Wavewalk kayak  in anticipation of using it for fishing the flooded grass because of the ease of standing in it and also because my lower back had been bothering me after long trips in my [15 ft long SOT fishing kayak]. Since then I’ve actually herniated a lumbar disk and was out of commission for 6 weeks, but although I’m functional now using the [15 ft long SOT fishing kayak] is out of the question in the near future.
I finally got to try out the W for what I bought it for.  We had flood tides over the weekend and I was anxious to pole the boat around the flooded spartina grass in search of tailing red fish.
I was not disappointed, it performed flawlessly.
It poles very easily in the grass, the view is great standing, and there is nearly no balancing effort for standing in it. I actually put a board across the top of the seat and poled standing on top of that. The view there is about 12″ above the water and the perspective that gives you hunting for tails is incredible.
I’ve also used the boat for some short trips fishing, and find that it’s a great little boat to fish out of because it allows you to be in so many positions while fishing and you never feel the need to get out and stretch or get the numbness out of your butt.
—————–
The Wavewalk is a keeper in my kayak herd now and for the near future will probably be the only boat I’ll be able to go out in. It’s nice and compact, stores a lot of stuff easily and keeps it dry, plus allows those of us with non cooperating bodies to fish more comfortably.
I’m also looking forward to staying nice and dry and warm fishing out of it this winter. This is a great boat to own even if my back wasn’t part of the reason I bought it.

K.

The Senior Kayak Angler blog chose not to publish the name and brand of the 15 ft long SOT fishing kayak mentioned here, similarly to the version of this review that was published on the Wavewalk Fishing Kayaks’ blog. Another version of this review was published on the Jacksonville Kayak Fishing forum, and it includes the SOT fishing kayak’s name and brand.