Good news for elderly kayak anglers

It’s as simple as that: Thanks to a new generation of fishing kayaks, which are lighter, stabler, and more comfortable than common kayaks are, anglers in their sixties and even anglers in their seventies can spend long hours on the water, and enjoy paddling and fishing without suffering from wetness, instability, back pain, leg numbness and cramps, or premature fatigue, which are all symptoms that are commonly experienced by people who fish out of kayaks, especially if they happen to be middle aged and elderly. They can even motorize their kayaks and by doing so travel long distances, and fish in remote locations, without being constrained by the limited physical power they have when paddling is concerned.

Gary is a retired biologist who worked for decades assisting Indian tribes throughout the country in managing their fish and wildlife resources.
He’s in his seventies now, and he lives in Florida.

Says Gary –

Fishing has been my passion since I was young, and I prefer to fish in saltwater, where I go for redfish, sea trout, snook, and other popular local fish species. I practice catch and release, unless someone close (wife or neighbors) orders a particular fish from me for dinner. I fish alone and with other kayak anglers.
Over the years, I’ve owned various fishing boats, and I stuck to the Wavewalk for several reasons; its unmatched stability, comfort and dryness, and the fact that unlike other kayaks it doesn’t hurt my back even if I spend the entire day fishing in it. I can stand up and unkink anytime I want, or lay down on the saddle and stretch.
It’s also lightweight, and that makes it easy for me to take it from my pickup truck to the beach, and back, even with all my fishing gear loaded inside its hulls.

Paddling my W is easy for me, even in harsh weather as it tracks perfectly without the need for a rudder.
In recent years, I’ve discovered the pleasures of wildlife photography out of my W kayak.
I’m planning to add a motor at some point so I can cover even greater distances. I had first opposed the idea of motorizing my kayak, but the numerous videos posted on Wavewalk’s blog have changed my mind.

All in all, it’s the most comfortable and functional fishing kayak I’ve seen.

Here are some pictures of Gary and his senior fishing buddies Bob and Dick:

 

Fishing trips with grandchildren on board your kayak

As one grows older, one usually grows wiser, and more cautious. Many elderly anglers who have fished from a kayak realize it’s a no go, because even the stablest sit-in, SOT or hybrid fishing kayak does not offer adequate comfort and sufficient stability. You don’t have to suffer from any particular physical condition to realize that.

These requirements limit your choice to basically one kayak, the W.

If you add on top of that a requirement that your kayak should enable you to take your grand kids on board comfortably and safely, although kids are known to behave unpredictably (and unsafely), you end up doing what this eighty year old grandfather from Tasmania (Australia) did, and you get yourself a W kayak:

Four passengers on board a stable fishing kayak
Eighty year old grandfather with three grandchildren paddling a stable fishing kayak – Tasmania, Australia

Older kayaker and crew of 3 children on board W kayak - Tasmania

Needless to say that teaching your young passengers to paddle together as a team, is another thing, and results may vary  😀

Do you have grandchildren? Interested in learning more about kayak fishing with kids? >

Note: This blog, Senior Kayak Angler, is dedicated to everything that elderly anglers may be interested in and concerned about regarding kayak fishing.

Don Snags Impressive Bass from Fishing Kayak Despite Arthritis

I own a [brand name kayak distributed by a nationwide fishing gear chain store].
I tried out my son Clint’s Wavewalk kayak and caught this 6 lb-4oz largemouth flipping jigs in the heavy weeds. I have arthritic knees and the stand up fishing in the Wavewalk kayak is awesome, so I ordered one for myself.

Don

fisherman holding 6.4 lbs largemouth bass he caught in W kayaks

Gary Rankel Tour Tampa Bay in his W Fishing Kayak

Neil, kayak fishing guide extraordinaire, took me on a 2-day fishing tour of the Tampa Bay area this week, and took these pictures of some of the snook and redfish we caught. We had nice overcast weather and the Wavewalk fishing kayak performed great as usual. Thanks to Neil, I’ll now have a few more places to check out when fishing slows down in Ozello.

Gary

Ricky Heads out With his ‘Personal Trout Assault Vehicle’

Headed out at 5:45 AM, hoping to beat the expected 108 degree temperatures.
We are fishing the Norfork River, a small but storied tailwater beginning at the base of the Norfork Dam and ending four and one half miles later at the confluence with the White at the little town of Norfork, Arkansas. The dam’s two generators are shut down, and the river is extremely low, gin clear but cool. These conditions require a specialized floatation tool, the Wavewalk, very thin tippets, and long casts with pinhead size flies, size 18 and 20.
The fish are easily spooked, and getting to them requires traversing eight shoal areas, that dissect the stream and limit access. Without a craft capable of moving well through skinny water, light enough to be manhandled, and tough enough to be dragged through rocky terrain, one simply fishes the public areas, does a lot of wading on slippery rocks, or fishes somewhere else.

My “Personal Trout Assault Vehicle” allowed such a trip and it paid off handsomely with many fine rainbow, aggressive browns, and resplendent cutthroat trout being brought to hand during our six hour day.

My paddling skills are improving, and my ability to read the fast water allowed me to have to exit the vessel less frequently, remembering that I test the recommended single occupancy of our vessel. My much lighter companion rarely if ever had to push off, but did manage to nail a large rock in a swift shoal and stick. He jumped out, the boat eased off, and he reentered, hardly deterred.

This fishing kayak gives me access to water that before would have not been available to me. That’s why I fish in a kayak, my trout assault vehicle.

Rickey

fishing kayak on the Norfolk river, Ozarks, Arkansas

Fly fisherman standing in the river, next to his kayak, in the pouring rain

fly fisherman showing rainbow trout caught in his fishing kayak, Ozark, AR

fly fisherman fishing out of his fishing kayak, Arkansas