Seniors Paddling a Fishing Kayak in Tandem – Fishing Kayak Review

Normally, kayakers have less power to spend on paddling as they get older, and their sense of balance is usually not as good as it was in their younger days. This makes paddling kayaks in tandem more of a challenge for them, especially if one member of the crew is disabled, and cannot paddle.

This is a wonderful kayak review recently published on the W fishing kayaks blog – The author, an elderly woman from North Carolina, describes in a few sentences how comfortable her W500 kayak feels for paddling, in tandem, and even when the second passenger on board is prevented from taking part in the paddling effort:

“My husband is unable to paddle due to many disabilities. However, I have 2 paddles and when he is along and we want to turn, I holler rudder right or rudder left and he puts his paddle straight down and we can turn “on a dime”.
I enjoy his company and sure, it is extra weight, but I do not feel unstable.
I am getting a little extra workout but that is a benefit in my opinion. I also have the joy of sharing the beautiful environment with the guy I love most and that means so much. As for tandem kayaking, it depends on where you are. On the intracoastal in a mild wind, 8 mph, my friend and I do not need any experience except more muscle in our forearms. The W is very stable and everyone who has been in my W has enjoyed it immensely. Almost 70,”… —

Understanding Kayak Back Pain

With old age, many people suffer from chronic pain, usually in their joints, so they would and should rather avoid more pain, and this time in their back – as a result of paddling the wrong types of kayaks, and fishing from them.

What is pain, actually?

Can pain be useful to you?

What to do once you feel pain after being in a kayak for some time?

How to avoid back pain resulting from kayaking, and fishing from kayaks?

This new article called “What Is Kayak back Pain, and What Does It Mean For You” explains these issues, and offers some pretty good advice, which is basically: When you feel pain as a result of doing something (e.g. kayaking) – stop doing it, and don’t do it again unless you found a way to eliminate the source of pain. In other words – don’t paddle kayaks, or fish from them, if it makes your back sore, because you’ll be sorry for doing so.

Older Age and Kayak Injuries

Old age doesn’t at all mean you should stay at home, and you definitely can and should seek physical activity, but at the same be aware of the risks of being injured while practicing your favorite sport, whether it’s fishing, kayaking, or the combination of both, namely kayak fishing.

Elderly kayakers and kayak anglers are more prone to getting injured while using their fishing kayaks than younger kayakers and kayak anglers are. The older you get the more vulnerable your body becomes to being mistreated and abused, including when praticing various sports and outdoor activities, and the more serious the injury gets to be, in terms of pain, gravity, and the time and means it takes to heel, and for you to recover.

Old age doesn’t at all mean you should stay at home, and you definitely can and should seek physical activity, but at the same be aware of the risks of being injured while practicing your favorite sport, whether it’s fishing, kayaking, or the combination of both, namely kayak fishing.

Before you start fishing from kayaks, you’d better know what type of injuries you may be risking, and the best ways to avoid them. The best article that covers these issues is called Common Kayak Injuries,  and it relates to both kayaking and kayak fishing, since paddling sit-in and SOT fishing kayaks is not different from operating any other recreational or touring kayak. Typically, such injuries are the result of having to paddle while being seated in the L position, and from the application of traditional kayaking technique in this position.

Needless to say that elderly kayak anglers can get injured while entering a sit-in kayak, or when they come out of it, since these actions become increasingly difficult and demanding as one grows old, to a point where many old kayakers and kayak anglers can no longer take the physical abuse involved, and are forced to quit the sport they love.

Senior Moments in Kayak Fishing

If you’ve been in a kayak, especially if you’ve tried fishing from one, you would have probably felt restricted by the small space offered to you, as well as by the craft’s limited stability. Such initial conditions are not recommended for fishing, for obvious reasons, and they are particularly challenging for people above a certain age, who need to be more comfortable and safer in more than one sense.

If you’ve been in a kayak, especially if you’ve tried fishing from one, you would have probably felt restricted by the small space offered to you, as well as by the craft’s limited stability.

Such initial conditions are not recommended for fishing, for obvious reasons, and they are particularly challenging for people above a certain age, who need to be more comfortable and safer in more than one sense.

A significant proportion of kayak fishing capsize accidents happens while the kayak is stationary, and the angler inside, or on top of it is fishing, and loses balance, often while trying to get hold of some piece of fishing equipment stored in a hatch that’s too difficult to access, or fell on board or inside the kayak.

You can capsize a fishing kayak simply by turning around to talk to another person, or observe something on the water, or on shore.

Sitting peacefully in a common fishing kayak and being hit by a sudden wake sent by a motorboat you didn’t notice can result in an overturned kayak, especially if the kayak is not super-stable, and your own reactions are a bit too slow, or excessive.

In other cases, the angler is standing in his kayak, or on the deck of their SOT kayak, believing the kayak is suitable for stand up fishing, just to discover, a bit too late, that there’s no ‘Plan B’ option in case they lose balance, which can be caused by a variety of things, including being distracted by external events, or by one’s own wandering thoughts…

There are over forty million people who fish in the United States alone, and many of them are seniors. There are also over seventeen million leisure boats in the country, most of which are motorboats, and many that are used for fishing, including by many elderly people. In comparison, the number of people who fish from kayaks is dismal, and the proportion of senior kayak anglers out of the entire kayak fishing population is small. This basically means two things: That when fishing is concerned, the overwhelming majority of anglers prefer motorboats to kayaks, and that kayak fishing isn’t particularly appealing to senior anglers, and for good reasons.

CONCLUSION

In order for fishing kayaks to accommodate the needs of senior anglers, such craft should offer more comfort, stability and accessible storage than all sit-in and SOT fishing kayaks offer,  as well as easy access into the kayak, getting out easily, and an overall level of usability and safety that seniors can find only in W fishing kayaks – for normal conditions as well as for those ‘senior moments’ that can happen to anyone.

The Senior Kayak Angler

When kayak fishing is considered, more people like you realize that it’s a nice idea, in theory, but when people like yourself are considering it – it’s a no go, because there are too many problems associated with it, as well as risks. This blog is meant to be your voice – The voice of the senior kayak angler who likes the idea of fishing from kayaks, abut won’t accept the risks, discomfort and pain that come with it.
This blog will address both problems and solutions presented by fishing kayaks today, as experienced and perceived by elderly anglers who’s been there and done that, and won’t buy the hype.

We’re all seniors, or hope to become seniors when the time comes, and we all want to lead a healthy and active life, without compromising our comfort and safety.

Comes a certain age, when you realize that you have the right and obligation to think for yourself, as well as the capability to do so. That’s also when you begin to think like a wise person, which usually means being more careful (or simply less careless…) and take into consideration questions like “What If?”, and “Says Who?”.

You don’t get excited that easily, and you’re more skeptical, and critical.

When kayak fishing is considered, more people like you realize that it’s a nice idea, in theory, but when people like yourself are considering it – it’s a no go, because there are too many problems associated with it, as well as risks.

This blog is meant to be your voice – The voice of the senior kayak angler who likes the idea of fishing from kayaks, abut won’t accept the risks, discomfort and pain that come with it.

This blog will address both problems and solutions presented by fishing kayaks today, as experienced and perceived by elderly anglers who’s been there and done that, and won’t buy the hype.

When you’re ten years old, overturning your kayak is an achievement, and when you’re twenty years old, it’s fun. When you’re thirty years old it’s no big deal, and when you’re forty years old it something you’re rather avoid, but it’s still acceptable.  When you’re fifty years old, it’s an unpleasant accident, and when you’re over sixty years old it’s something that should not happen. Period.

As for leg numbness, back pain, wet butt, yak ass and other physical problems, minor or major – younger people may accept them and tolerate them as part of the sport of kayak fishing, but elderly anglers simply reject them, and rightfully so.

Kayak fishing is meant to be fun, and not some hazardous outdoor torture, and this is a notion that does not require to be proven, or justified – It’s axiomatic, meaning that it goes without saying.

Comments are welcome on this blog, and you don’t have to become a “member” or even register to post your thoughts and comments. However, all comments will be moderated, and should be appropriate and suitable for all audiences, from old to very young.