Understanding Kayak Back Pain

With old age, many people suffer from chronic pain, usually in their joints, so they would and should rather avoid more pain, and this time in their back – as a result of paddling the wrong types of kayaks, and fishing from them.

What is pain, actually?

Can pain be useful to you?

What to do once you feel pain after being in a kayak for some time?

How to avoid back pain resulting from kayaking, and fishing from kayaks?

This new article called “What Is Kayak back Pain, and What Does It Mean For You” explains these issues, and offers some pretty good advice, which is basically: When you feel pain as a result of doing something (e.g. kayaking) – stop doing it, and don’t do it again unless you found a way to eliminate the source of pain. In other words – don’t paddle kayaks, or fish from them, if it makes your back sore, because you’ll be sorry for doing so.

How Suitable Are Pedal Drives For Senior Kayak Anglers?

Senior kayak anglers are always on the lookout for new products that fit their needs. Some senior kayak anglers are finding it hard to paddle their kayaks, and outfit them with electric trolling motors, or try pedal drive propulsion, since pedaling is supposed to be easier than paddling, because our legs are stronger than our arms.

Senior kayak anglers are always on the lookout for new products that fit their needs. Some senior kayak anglers are finding it hard to paddle their kayaks, and outfit them with electric trolling motors, or try pedal drive propulsion, since pedaling is supposed to be easier than paddling, because our legs are stronger than our arms.

A new article sheds a new light on pedal drive propulsion for fishing kayaks

The article discusses the four main aspects of pedaling fishing kayaks versus paddling them, which are: Ergonomics – How does a kayak angler feel when they operate a pedal driven kayak. Of particular interest is the discussion about the potential physiological drawbacks in this type of propulsion. These drawbacks include increased back pain, leg pain, and foot pain. Mechanics -How efficient are pedal drives’ pedaling systems. This part is important to senior kayak anglers, as it touches the problem of them having less power to waste than younger kayakers have. Hydrodynamics -How efficient are pedal drives’ propellers, and how effective is pedaling kayaks compared to paddling them. This technical issue is interesting as well, in view of the hype created around pedal drives. Real World Performance – How effective are pedal driven kayaks in applications such as fishing trips, stand up fishing, fishing in moving water, fishing in shallow water, launching, beaching, etc. This part is obviously the most important, since it tells whether there’s any real gain in using pedal driven kayaks for fishing. The part about hands free kayaking is hilarious.

What Use Can Seniors Have Of A Typical SOT Fishing Kayak?

The typical fishing kayak these days is a big, long and heavy SOT kayak, equipped with all the bells and whistles one can imagine. Aside from the fact that sitting in it hurts your back, and is uncomfortable for your legs, it’s also very heavy, and hard to paddle.

The typical fishing kayak these days is a big, long and heavy SOT kayak, equipped with all the bells and whistles one can imagine. Aside from the fact that sitting in it hurts your back, and is uncomfortable for your legs, it’s also very heavy, and hard to paddle.
On top of that, those kayaks are advertised as being stable enough for stand up fishing, but it turns out that it’s not exactly a realistic description…

A  fishing kayak review combined with a fishing trip report recently published on the  the Jacksonville Kayak Fishing forum tells the story from the angle of a fly angler who’s not old, but has had back pain, and a herniated lumbar disk:

I bought a Wavewalk kayak  in anticipation of using it for fishing the flooded grass because of the ease of standing in it and also because my lower back had been bothering me after long trips in my [15 ft long SOT fishing kayak]. Since then I’ve actually herniated a lumbar disk and was out of commission for 6 weeks, but although I’m functional now using the [15 ft long SOT fishing kayak] is out of the question in the near future.
I finally got to try out the W for what I bought it for.  We had flood tides over the weekend and I was anxious to pole the boat around the flooded spartina grass in search of tailing red fish.
I was not disappointed, it performed flawlessly.
It poles very easily in the grass, the view is great standing, and there is nearly no balancing effort for standing in it. I actually put a board across the top of the seat and poled standing on top of that. The view there is about 12″ above the water and the perspective that gives you hunting for tails is incredible.
I’ve also used the boat for some short trips fishing, and find that it’s a great little boat to fish out of because it allows you to be in so many positions while fishing and you never feel the need to get out and stretch or get the numbness out of your butt.
—————–
The Wavewalk is a keeper in my kayak herd now and for the near future will probably be the only boat I’ll be able to go out in. It’s nice and compact, stores a lot of stuff easily and keeps it dry, plus allows those of us with non cooperating bodies to fish more comfortably.
I’m also looking forward to staying nice and dry and warm fishing out of it this winter. This is a great boat to own even if my back wasn’t part of the reason I bought it.

K.

The Senior Kayak Angler blog chose not to publish the name and brand of the 15 ft long SOT fishing kayak mentioned here, similarly to the version of this review that was published on the Wavewalk Fishing Kayaks’ blog. Another version of this review was published on the Jacksonville Kayak Fishing forum, and it includes the SOT fishing kayak’s name and brand.


Older Age and Kayak Injuries

Old age doesn’t at all mean you should stay at home, and you definitely can and should seek physical activity, but at the same be aware of the risks of being injured while practicing your favorite sport, whether it’s fishing, kayaking, or the combination of both, namely kayak fishing.

Elderly kayakers and kayak anglers are more prone to getting injured while using their fishing kayaks than younger kayakers and kayak anglers are. The older you get the more vulnerable your body becomes to being mistreated and abused, including when praticing various sports and outdoor activities, and the more serious the injury gets to be, in terms of pain, gravity, and the time and means it takes to heel, and for you to recover.

Old age doesn’t at all mean you should stay at home, and you definitely can and should seek physical activity, but at the same be aware of the risks of being injured while practicing your favorite sport, whether it’s fishing, kayaking, or the combination of both, namely kayak fishing.

Before you start fishing from kayaks, you’d better know what type of injuries you may be risking, and the best ways to avoid them. The best article that covers these issues is called Common Kayak Injuries,  and it relates to both kayaking and kayak fishing, since paddling sit-in and SOT fishing kayaks is not different from operating any other recreational or touring kayak. Typically, such injuries are the result of having to paddle while being seated in the L position, and from the application of traditional kayaking technique in this position.

Needless to say that elderly kayak anglers can get injured while entering a sit-in kayak, or when they come out of it, since these actions become increasingly difficult and demanding as one grows old, to a point where many old kayakers and kayak anglers can no longer take the physical abuse involved, and are forced to quit the sport they love.