Good news for elderly kayak anglers

It’s as simple as that: Thanks to a new generation of fishing kayaks, which are lighter, stabler, and more comfortable than common kayaks are, anglers in their sixties and even anglers in their seventies can spend long hours on the water, and enjoy paddling and fishing without suffering from wetness, instability, back pain, leg numbness and cramps, or premature fatigue, which are all symptoms that are commonly experienced by people who fish out of kayaks, especially if they happen to be middle aged and elderly. They can even motorize their kayaks and by doing so travel long distances, and fish in remote locations, without being constrained by the limited physical power they have when paddling is concerned.

Gary is a retired biologist who worked for decades assisting Indian tribes throughout the country in managing their fish and wildlife resources.
He’s in his seventies now, and he lives in Florida.

Says Gary –

Fishing has been my passion since I was young, and I prefer to fish in saltwater, where I go for redfish, sea trout, snook, and other popular local fish species. I practice catch and release, unless someone close (wife or neighbors) orders a particular fish from me for dinner. I fish alone and with other kayak anglers.
Over the years, I’ve owned various fishing boats, and I stuck to the Wavewalk for several reasons; its unmatched stability, comfort and dryness, and the fact that unlike other kayaks it doesn’t hurt my back even if I spend the entire day fishing in it. I can stand up and unkink anytime I want, or lay down on the saddle and stretch.
It’s also lightweight, and that makes it easy for me to take it from my pickup truck to the beach, and back, even with all my fishing gear loaded inside its hulls.

Paddling my W is easy for me, even in harsh weather as it tracks perfectly without the need for a rudder.
In recent years, I’ve discovered the pleasures of wildlife photography out of my W kayak.
I’m planning to add a motor at some point so I can cover even greater distances. I had first opposed the idea of motorizing my kayak, but the numerous videos posted on Wavewalk’s blog have changed my mind.

All in all, it’s the most comfortable and functional fishing kayak I’ve seen.

Here are some pictures of Gary and his senior fishing buddies Bob and Dick:

 

Fishing trips with grandchildren on board your kayak

As one grows older, one usually grows wiser, and more cautious. Many elderly anglers who have fished from a kayak realize it’s a no go, because even the stablest sit-in, SOT or hybrid fishing kayak does not offer adequate comfort and sufficient stability. You don’t have to suffer from any particular physical condition to realize that.

These requirements limit your choice to basically one kayak, the W.

If you add on top of that a requirement that your kayak should enable you to take your grand kids on board comfortably and safely, although kids are known to behave unpredictably (and unsafely), you end up doing what this eighty year old grandfather from Tasmania (Australia) did, and you get yourself a W kayak:

Four passengers on board a stable fishing kayak
Eighty year old grandfather with three grandchildren paddling a stable fishing kayak – Tasmania, Australia

Older kayaker and crew of 3 children on board W kayak - Tasmania

Needless to say that teaching your young passengers to paddle together as a team, is another thing, and results may vary  😀

Do you have grandchildren? Interested in learning more about kayak fishing with kids? >

Note: This blog, Senior Kayak Angler, is dedicated to everything that elderly anglers may be interested in and concerned about regarding kayak fishing.

Rox Catches Some Bass from her Fishing Kayak

July has been a slow month for kayak fishing for me.
I was wading the Ct River for some awesome Small Mouth Bass fishing, and was rewarded with some fine Bass.
The only problem with fishing the river is slippery bottoms, especially around the ledges. I lost my footing after a long morning of wading, slipped off a boulder, and wedged my left ankle in between two rocks…
I didn’t break anything, I don’t bounce like I used to. But I had some bad cuts from the rocks’ sharp edges…. and the car was three miles down river…
I walked back, went to the ER, and they cleaned up my cuts, but the 4 1/2 lb Small Mouth Bass I caught before the fall, made the whole trip worth it.

I didn’t get back out till just last week, I was going stir crazy with no fishing since the 3rd of July.

Here are some pictures from the wading to the old yellow W300 kayak pond hopping, and from a fishing trip with my buddy to Congamond Lake in Massachusetts.

The Battles were fast and furious, Med/Hvy rod with 40lb Fireline braid made quick work pulling the bass out of the lilies and weeds.

Rox

large mouth bass caught in old fishing kayak

largemouth bass posing for a photo in old fishing kayak

nice bass from fishing trip 07-2012

big bass caught by kayak angler 07-2012.jpg

big bass caught by famous kayak angler Rox 07-2012

First WaveWalk Paddle Trip, Kayak Review By Retired Gentleman From Texas

Took my WaveWalk out this morning for my first paddle and decided to take a trip thru some of our marshes down here. According to a google earth retracing of my steps I covered about 5.7 miles in 2 hours at a leisurely pace (as would be expected from a Retired Gentleman of Leisure).
The wind was blowing about 8 mph when I started and picked up to 15 to 20 towards the last half of the trip. We had a thunder storm moving in with the usual increase in winds, cloudiness and slight drop in temperature. Literally “no sweat.”
This gave me a chance to compare how the WaveWalk handled the wind as compared to my experiences with both sit in and sit on top kayaks. I think that I can sum it up as WOW! All I had to do was shift my position to raise the bow or stern enough to give me enough weather vane effect to keep me pretty much on a straight course. It took a little experimentation, but I picked up on it pretty quick. I also think that the wind being channeled between the 2 hulls helped me stay on line to a degree. The main point is that I did NOT have to paddle just on one side to keep my heading in a quartering or broadside wind, even when crossing open water. Just scoot towards bow or stern and keep on truckin’.
I had a tug pushing a load of barges up the Neches River throw a pretty good wake at me when I was fixin’ to cross on my way back to the launch. I was pretty nervous, but I shifted my weight all the way to the back of the cockpit and took the 1.5 to 2 foot wake head on. No problems once I got over the initial “oh crap” moment, and the boat took the waves just fine.
I got caught in the rain for the last 40 minutes or so, but I was having so much fun that I decided that if Indians didn’t have ponchos then I didn’t need one either. I wonder if Hyawatha got as nervous as I did when the lightening started popping…
I had a great paddle.
Snuck up on birds, fish, a boat full of fisherman and the one small gator who wasn’t paying much attention. (choot ‘em, Lizabet) Got a few blisters and my muscles are a little sore (hey, I’m 60) but no yak back and my shoulder with arthritis feels pretty good. I was kind of surprised when I stepped out onto land at the end of the trip and staggered around for a few minutes. It’s true – you do use the muscles in your thighs when you paddle a WaveWalk, you just don’t notice it.

Being able to change positions while paddling also helped my knees tremendously. Years ago I shattered one knee cap twice (full of screws now) and tore cartilage in the other, so that was a big plus for me.
I only have one question – how come nobody thought of a catamaran hull concept for paddling craft a long time ago? Ok, so the Polynesians may have figured it out first on a larger scale. It needs less energy to paddle than a sit in, is much more stable than a SOT, your back doesn’t hurt and your butt stays dry! What more could you ask for?
I want to thank both of you for the amount of time that you spent giving me and my friend a test drive and a few tips. The only thing that I would suggest so far is a couple of tie downs inside the hull to tie a small dry box or whatever to securely keep your ID, cell phone, fishing license and maybe a few bucks from going swimming if you get swamped or capsize. Just a thought…

Anyway, thanks guys! I’m having a blast! I’m gonna infect my son with WaveWalk fever the first chance I get, as he is still using a SOT. I think Village Creek would be a good place to start him out.

Lee,
Nederland, Texas

Addendum:

I did a lot of research on the W500 – read all of the blogs and watched most of the videos – before I started saving the funds to possibly purchase one. I had the “book knowledge” on the W500 but not the practical experience. The purchase was totally dependent on a test drive to see if it was as advertised. It didn’t take long to get the basics down.

Although I do plan on doing some fishing from the W, I realized that I need to get more practical experience learning the boat before I do some inshore fishing in it. Plus it’s really great to get back to cruising the marshes & bayous like I used to do years ago. If you’re going into unfamiliar territory, especially back in the marshes, take the time to use GoogleEarth to print a map of the area. A compass is great, but the bayous twist & turn quite a bit and you often can see where you want to be but can’t get there without a map on board. Man, do I love GoogleEarth!

So I’m looking forward to spending some more time just wandering around and getting better with the W and enjoying the sights before I actually go fishing. I’d rather be in a narrow twisting bayou than just about anywhere. Thanks to the wealth of info at the W web site, for making retirement even better than it already is.

More fishing kayak reviews >

“I honestly don’t think there is any chance that this old man could have landed that fish in any other kayak but the Wavewalk”

It was too windy to fish in the river so I stayed in the lagoon by where my friend lets me keep my “W” kayak on his floating dock. I had been out in the morning about 7:30 AM and caught a small snook about 14 inches – a beautiful fish and since I got him on a small foam rubber “gurgler” fly it was fun to see a fish take that surface fly less than a foot from the mangroves in about eight inches of water. It took a little while reviving him in the water before releasing him before I could go looking for his big brother.
Fished until about noon got a couple of hook ups but nothing came to the boat.
I went back just about 7 PM and staked out at the corner of a nice grass flat in the lagoon next to the mangrove creek that feeds in from the Indian River.

It was low incoming tide one of the best times for the bigger fish to get in close to the flat in about four to five feet of water, they slip up on the grass flat and raid the little mullet fingerlings and grass shrimp and can dash back into the deeper water for cover.
So I fished different flies and different sides of the flat for about an hour… fifteen minutes after sunset I was making my “last cast” for the night and bang a freight train hits my fly about thirty five feet from the kayak I am standing on my platform on top of the center tunnel and all the line starts to shoot out of my striping basket and (for once it is not tangled up) whiz all the line is out of the basket probably 125 feet or so and I am on the reel and it is buzzing. First time I am down to my backing line it is still going out to open water in the lagoon (not back to the mangroves like sneaky snook usually do). So I let him go I mean he is too big and hot to horse in with an eight weight and 10 lb tippet. Three good runs, a couple of tries for the mangroves and 15 minutes later I have him in the boat.

snook caught in kayak night fly fishing, Florida

26″ snook WOW the first really nice fish I have ever caught out of the “W” and it was a beauty it took me almost 10 minutes to revive him pushing him through the water next to the boat. But finally he swam off before I was eaten to death by Florida mosquito’s it was almost dark but I was as high as a tree frog just paddling back to the dock whistling Dixie.

I have caught a few smallish fish in the lagoon but started to think that all the nice ones are in the river.

Oh yeah all you northern woodsman who are wondering why I released a five pound snook instead of eating him, there is a limit here we call “slot” fish, 28″ to 32″ inches if they are in the slot then they are keepers but he was a little shy of the slot. And after one of the best battles I have had on fly since my Trinity river steelhead days, I figured he deserved a second chance anyway.

snook caught in kayak night fly fishing, Florida

I love my “W” fishing kayak … when that fish was on I was thinking he went 360 degrees around the boat did three really long runs and in general made 15 minutes feel like about three. I honestly don’t think there is any chance that this old man could have landed that fish in any other kayak but the Wavewalk. I mean I fish with a friend who has five kayaks SOT and Sit in type and he is an athlete, but I have seen how little room to move and how cramped it is and if your line snags on anything when you have a big fish on a fly (even just for a moment) it is good by fish.

OK the truth is my one man fishing machine is a blend of “W’ stability and flexibility and my friend Rick Rosenberg’s outriggers system, and I JUST LOVE IT.

Going back out now, back to the snook lagoon “Middleton Cove” named after my friend who lets me store my boat on his floating dock – just lift on the bow handles and slide it in the water and I am gone Fishing !

Thanks for listening,

Ted ,
Florida

FL lagoon great for kayak fishing at night.jpg