No Yack Back Kayak Fishing, Now Down Under

Some people mistakenly think that older people are the only ones who suffer from back pain as a result of paddling conventional kayaks and fishing from them. This notion is false, of course, and young people suffer from yack back and kayaking injuries as well.

Kayak anglers down under! -Here is some good new for your lower back:

Steve suffered from kayaking back injuries, which brought him to look for a solution.
-“I have a love for water and paddling but after experiencing 2 months of pain and subsequent treatment as a direct result of using a S.O.T Sit On Top) Kayak, I thought there must be a better way. After spending many hours researching different options, I was convinced with out doubt that the Wavewalk was the way to go. I purchased a Wavewalk direct from the US in December of 2011 and has not looked back since. NO more PAIN or INJURIES.”

70 Year Old Fly Kayak Angler: My Experience With The W Fishing Kayak

A fishing kayak review from an experienced angler who’s tried various fishing styles and fishing boats often tell a lot. Here is Glynn Gantenbein’s account of his experience with the W fishing kayak:

I have been flyfishing around the world for 20 years, much of it in a kayak.
I found only two things were missing: a comfortable seating position and the ability to stand up for sighting fish.
After studying videos at Wavewalk, I ordered an inventory of Wavewalk kayaks without even seeing one.
Upon receipt I tested the Wavewalk… -I am 70 years old, weigh 230, have a bad back, need a knee replacement, and have constant vertigo from a chronic ear condition.
During my initial test I was able to stand up and paddle and really enjoyed the seating position called Riding.
IF I CAN DO IT, ANYONE CAN!!
The Wavewalk 500 is fast and runs straight.
Everything you read is correct.
One of my customers put a $100 trolling motor on his and said he was “going water skiing”… which was his way of saying its fast.

Glynn

big redfish caught in a kayak fishing trip Texas

My first red fish, caught on a fly

DIY motor mount for fishing kayak. Texas

Stand Up Fishing Kayak in the Sea of Cortez, Mexico

Says John Castanha: –

We have a house in San Carlos/Guaymas in Sonora, Mexico approximately 150 yards from the water, but getting to it is the challenge: cobblestone streets, rocks, and sandy beach.

transporting fishing kayak to the beach

transporting fishing kayak to the beach

getting ready to launch fishing kayak at the beach

Paddling feels natural – turning is easy.
Paddling standing up after about 10 minutes on the water. I have never been considered overly athletic, but standing up is do-able. This thing is stable! It would not be a problem to stand up and cast.

kayak fisherman paddling with dog on board

kayak fisherman paddling standing

kayak angler paddling with dogsSusie, Lele and Nani – “the girls of the Sea of Cortez”.

In the next 2-3 weeks we will be honing our paddling skills, touring, installing the transom mount and testing a 2HP-4 stroke, installing flush mount rod holders for trolling, and in general, getting ready for Dorado (Mahi-Mahi) season.

Tight lines and calm seas to all,

John & Susie

How To Read A Fishing Kayak Review?

Tough question indeed.

Moreover, why should you even bother to read that fishing kayak review in the first place?
There are so many fishing kayak reviews out there, in websites, online forums, and in print, and we’re supposed to read them all and make something out of it.
Well, I say it’s not serious.

To begin with, you should assign zero credibility to anything you read, whether online or in print, unless both author and publisher have done everything possible to come clear as far as their identity and intentions are concerned. Anyone publishing anything carries the burden of proof as far as the credibility of the stuff they publish goes. I say if it doesn’t look right, it ain’t right. Period.

Once you’re past that threshold, you can look and see if that fishing kayak review is interesting or meaningful to you in any way. Chances are it’s not that informative, and lacks relevance for you, although you may be able to learn something from it, as far as a particular issue goes.

So, if you want to know how to begin looking for fishing kayak reviews and parsing all the stuff (sorry, I meant to say BS) the Internet would throw at you, here’s a link to your guide to fishing kayak reviews >>

The Fascinating Kayak Fishing World

The sport of kayak fishing and the kayak fishing industry have evolved considerably in the past decade, and this blog will cover both.

The statistics for this sport are unreliable, and possibly even non-existent, but judging by the number of participants in local kayak fishing tournaments in the US, for which the statistics are reliable, and by other sources of quasi reliable data (E.G. Google), it is possible to estimate the total number of people who fish regularly from kayaks (I.E. kayak anglers) as ranging in the lower tens of thousands.

The sport of kayak fishing and the kayak fishing industry have evolved considerably in the past decade, and this blog will cover both.

The statistics for this sport are unreliable, and possibly even non-existent, but judging by the number of participants in local kayak fishing tournaments in the US, for which the statistics are reliable, and by other sources of quasi reliable data (E.G. Google), it is possible to estimate the total number of people who fish regularly from kayaks (I.E. kayak anglers) as ranging in the lower tens of thousands.

This number is still very small in comparison with the overall number of people who take part in recreational fishing, estimated at over forty million in the US alone, and compared with the total number of leisure boats registered in the US, which attains seventeen million – most of them motorboats.

The United States being the biggest market for boats, kayaks, and fishing gear makes such estimate more compatible with reality.

As for the growth rate in participation, judging from Internet activity, as well as numbers of participants in local kayak fishing tournaments, it is possible to say that the exponential growth rate that characterized the first half of this decade has plateaued, or at least come down to a rate of a few percent annually.

The New Jersey store that pioneered this sport, and played an important role in promoting it through its popular online forums, closed a year ago. On the other hand, major distributors of fishing gear and fishing boats now offer fishing kayaks as part of their regular product offering.

As far as media coverage in concerned, two opposite trends can be perceived:

The first is a slow decrease in external coverage, that is the overall attention given to kayak fishing in the general media (TV and newspapers) has been decreasing steadily.

On the other hand, the kayak fishing market itself has come up with a plethora of online publications, from kayak fishing magazines to websites and discussion forums, and blogs. There is still only one hard copy kayak fishing magazine, and it is not clear if its publishers intend to keep printing it, since its number of issues published per year keeps decreasing.

Kayak fishing has become much more popular in the southern, warmer regions of the United States, and its popularity decreases in a direct relation to factors such as average temperature (weather), water temperature, and the number of sunny days, or ‘fishable days’ in the year. Although fishing from shore and from boats is very popular in the Northern regions, kayak fishing isn’t.

This probably explains why sit-on-top (SOT) kayaks are more popular as fishing kayaks than sit-in (SIK) kayaks are. Simply, southern kayak anglers prefer the SOT over the SIK  due the its being self-bailing, and they are less concerned about being protected from the elements, I.E. cold water and/or cold wind. As for northern anglers, they don’t seem to embrace the notion that fishing from a small, unstable and exposed boat such as either a SOT or a sit-in kayak is fun.